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Spot the Red Flags

Rogue movers typically work like this: Without ever visiting your home or seeing the goods you want moved, they give a low estimate over the telephone or Internet. Once your goods are on their truck, they demand more money before they will deliver or unload them. They hold your goods hostage and force you to pay more — sometimes much more than you thought you had agreed to — if you want your possessions back.

Your best defense is to recognize a rogue mover before they have your goods.

Here are the “red flags” to look out for:

  • The mover doesn’t offer or agree to an on­site inspection of your household goods and gives an estimate over the telephone or online — sight unseen. These estimates often sound too good to be true. They usually are.
  • The moving company demands cash or a large deposit before the move.
  • The mover asks you to sign blank or incomplete documents.
  • The mover does not provide a written estimate (can be binding or non-binding).
  • The mover doesn’t provide you with a copy of the Your Rights and Responsibilities When You Move booklet and a copy of FMCSA’s Ready to Move brochure, which movers are required by Federal regulations to supply to their customers in the planning stages of interstate moves.
  • The company’s website has no local address and no information about their registration or insurance.
  • The mover claims all goods are covered by their insurance.
  • When you call the mover, the telephone is answered with a generic “Movers” or “Moving company,” rather than the company’s name.
  • Offices and warehouse are in poor condition or nonexistent.
  • The mover says they will determine the charges after loading.
  • On moving day, a rental truck arrives rather than a company­-owned or marked fleet truck.
  • The mover claims, “You’ve got more stuff than estimated!” Should this occur, be sure the mover provides a revised estimate that you both sign listing the additional items and/or services as well as a price that you both have agreed to and signed BEFORE they begin packing or loading. They should also provide you a copy of this new estimate.

>> Next: Tips for a Successful Move

Protect your move bear and moving checklist
Last updated: Monday, February 2, 2015