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How are split sleeper berth rest periods used in determining compliance with the 14-hour "driving window" rule?

Frequently Asked Questions Relating to 2020 Changes to Hours of Service Regulations

Question 4

Q: How are split sleeper berth rest periods used in determining compliance with the 14-hour "driving window" rule?

A: Off-duty and sleeper berth rest periods that qualify for the split sleeper berth provision are excluded from the 14-hour "driving window" when the rest periods are properly paired. When more than a single pairing of rest periods is possible, the pairing that should be used is the pairing that results in no violations or the fewest violations, in the following order:

  • Nominal violations (less than 15 minutes in violation)
  • Violations
  • Out-of-Service (OOS) violations during a roadside inspection or egregious violations during an investigation (more than 3 hours in violation).

If all options result in the same number and severity of violations, the qualifying rest period that affords the driver the most available on-duty and driving time moving forward should be selected.

Regulatory Topic: Hours of Service
Published Date: Thursday, November 19, 2020
Issued Date: Thursday, November 19, 2020