You are here

  • § 393.11
    Lamps and reflective devices.
  • § 393.17
    Lamps and reflectors—combinations in driveaway-towaway operation.
  • § 393.24
    Requirements for head lamps, auxiliary driving lamps and front fog lamps.
  • § 393.25
    Requirements for lamps other than head lamps.
  • § 393.28
    Wiring systems.
  • § 393.40
    Required brake systems.
  • § 393.41
    Parking brake system.
  • § 393.42
    Brakes required on all wheels.
  • § 393.43
    Breakaway and emergency braking.
  • § 393.44
    Front brake lines, protection.
  • § 393.48
    Brakes to be operative.
  • § 393.51
    Warning signals, air pressure and vacuum gauges.
  • § 393.52
    Brake performance.
  • § 393.60
    Glazing in specified openings.
  • § 393.61
    Truck and truck tractor window construction.
  • § 393.62
    Emergency exits for buses.
  • § 393.65
    All fuel systems.
  • § 393.67
    Liquid fuel tanks.
  • § 393.70
    Coupling devices and towing methods, except for driveaway-towaway operations.
  • § 393.71
    Coupling devices and towing methods, driveaway-towaway operations.
  • § 393.75
    Tires.
  • § 393.76
    Sleeper berths.
  • § 393.81
    Horn.
  • § 393.82
    Speedometer.
  • § 393.83
    Exhaust systems.
  • § 393.87
    Warning flags on projecting loads.
  • § 393.88
    Television receivers.
  • § 393.89
    Buses, driveshaft protection.
  • § 393.92
  • § 393.93
    Seats, seat belt assemblies, and seat belt assembly anchorages.
  • § 393.100
    Which types of commercial motor vehicles are subject to the cargo securement standards of this subpart, and what general requirements apply?
  • § 393.102
    What are the minimum performance criteria for cargo securement devices and systems?
  • § 393.106
    What are the general requirements for securing articles of cargo?
  • § 393.201
    Frames.

Part 393

Section § 393.61: Truck and truck tractor window construction.

Below are the available interpretations for the given section. To return to the list of parts, use the Parts link above. The menu to the left provides a full list of sections that have interpretations. To view interpretations for a different section, click on the menu item.

The regulations text of the section can be found on the eCFR website. To view the regulations text, use the link below. For assistance, please send an email to FMCSA.Webmaster@dot.gov.
View regulations for Part 393

Question 1: Do school buses used for purposes other than school bus operations (as defined in §390.5), have to meet additional emergency exits requirements under §393.61?

Guidance:

Yes. §393.61(b)(2) says that "a bus, including a school bus, manufactured on and after September 1, 1973," must conform with National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)’s §571.217 (Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) (FMVSS) 217). At the time this provision was adopted, Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) (FMVSS) 217 applied only to other buses and it was optional for school buses. The Federal Highway Administration FHWA inserted the language, "including school buses," in §393.61(b)(2) to make clear that school buses used in interstate commerce and, therefore, subject to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs), were required to comply with the bus exit standards in Standard Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) (FMVSS) 217.

Sec. 393.61(b)(3) regarding push-out windows provides that older buses must conform with the requirements of §§393.61(b) or 571.217. Buses which are subject to §571.217 would follow National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)’s interpretation on push-out windows. Buses which are subject to §393.61(b)(1) of the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations (FMCSRs) are required to have emergency windows that are either push-out windows or that have laminated safety glass that can be pushed out in a manner similar to a push-out window.

Question 2: For emergency exits which consist of laminated safety glass, is the window frame or sash required to move outward from the bus as is the case with push-out windows?

Guidance:

No. Laminated safety glass is an alternative to the use of push-out windows for buses manufactured before September 1, 1973. §393.61(c) requires that every glazed opening used to satisfy the emergency exit space requirements, "if not glazed with laminated safety glass, shall have a frame or sash so designed, constructed, and maintained that it will yield outwardly to provide the required free opening. * * *" Laminated safety glass meeting Test No. 25, Egress, American National Standard "Safety Code for Safety Glazing Materials for Glazing Motor Vehicles Operating on Land Highways," Z26.1-1966 as supplemented by Z26.1a-1969 (referenced in §§393.61(c) and 393.60(a)) is intended to provide an adequate means of emergency exit on older buses without resorting to push-out windows.

However, buses with a seating capacity of more than 10 people manufactured after September 1, 1973, must have push-out windows that conform to 49 CFR 571.217

Question 3: When calculating the minimum emergency exit space required on school buses used in non-school bus operations, should two or three passengers per bench seat be used in determining the adult seating capacity?

Guidance: The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) has indicated that "School buses can transport 3 to a seat if the passengers are in grades 1 through 5, and 2 per seat in grades 9 through 12." (May 9, 1995, 60 FR 24562, 24567) Therefore, for vehicles originally manufactured as school buses, the total pupil seating capacity provided by the bus manufacturer should be multiplied by 2/3 to determine the adult seating capacity for the purposes of §393.61. This generally yields the same result as using two adults per bench seat.

Question 4: Do school buses which meet the school bus emergency exit requirements established by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA)’s November 2, 1992, final rule on Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) FMVSS No. 217 have to be retrofitted with additional emergency exits when used in interstate commerce for non-school bus operations?

Guidance: No. On May 9, 1995, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) amended Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) FMVSS No. 217 to permit non-school buses to meet either the current non-school bus emergency exit requirements or the upgraded school bus exit requirements established by the November 2, 1992 (57 FR 49413), final rule which became effective on September 1, 1994. Therefore, school buses which meet the upgraded emergency exit standards meet the requirements of §393.61 without the retrofitting of additional exits.

Question 5: Which edition of Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) FMVSS No. 217 is required to be used in determining the emergency exit space requirements when retrofitting buses?

Guidance: The cross reference to Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) FMVSS No. 217 applies to the requirements in effect at the time of manufacture of the bus. Motor carriers are not, however, prohibited from retrofitting their buses to the most up-to-date requirements in Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (developed and issued by the NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration) FMVSS No. 217. Therefore, at a minimum, motor carriers must meet the non-school bus emergency exit requirements in effect at the time of manufacture, and have the option of retrofitting their buses to meet the emergency exit requirements established by the Novem ber 2, 1992 (57 FR 49413), final rule which became effective on September 1, 1994.


Submit Feedback >